International Dance Day Today!

Since 1982 the International Dance Council (CID) of the UNESCO invites us to celebrate the International Dance Day on the 29th of April. Its aim is to promote the international recognition of dance as a distinctive art form because, as the CID notes, across countries and cultures of the world dance still does not receive the same attention and consideration as other art forms.

The universal recognition of dance as an art form has clear implications for neuroaesthetics! Research in this field in the past few years has shown dance to be a noteworthy art form that can gracefully reveal important details of the emotional, cognitive and neural underpinnings of human art appreciation.

However, neuroaesthetics of dance is undoubtedly still in its infancy. Research on dance appreciation poses an array of remarkable experimental design demands to the neuroaesthetician. The first obstacle to overcome is the short-lived nature of a piece of dance –it is gone at the very moment of performance. Moreover, for experimental purposes, ideally, the dance movements must be extracted from very thoroughly crafted choreographies; the movements must be isolated from facial and musical information and, furthermore, be presented to experimental participants in the remote setting of a laboratory. Undoubtedly, this entrains an experience in the observer that is considerably different from the experience of attending a genuine dance performance. Secondly, as in all art forms, the perception of a dance is notably influenced by its cultural background and meaning, as well as by the historical moment of choreography and performance. Thus, a truly ecological experimental approach to dance seems complicated, if not impossible. Nevertheless, scientific aesthetics can overcome at least some of these constraints. By integrating existing scholarship from dance theory and humanistic approaches on dance practice, neuroaesthetics may actually find ways to approach the process of experimental design with dance movements in a more ecological fashion.

Research on dance appreciation, so far, has focused on movement perception, structure perception and emotion recognition, both in behavioral and neuroimaging studies. However, to date only few studies have linked the findings from such basic research questions with the hedonics of the proper aesthetic experience derived from the observation of that same dance movement. This is where promising avenues of study for future experimental aesthetics and neuroaesthetics reside…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s