Call for Registration: Art and Affect in the Predictive Mind

Call for Registration Art and Affect in the Predictive Mind Online, 30 June – 2 July 2021 You are warmly invited to Art and Affect in the Predictive Mind, a three-day international and interdisciplinary conference that will bring together philosophers, art historians, and cognitive scientists for the first systematic exploration of the intersections between predictive processing and […]

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WOMEN PIONEERS OF EMPIRICAL AESTHETICS (3): KATE GORDON

Kate Gordon (1878-1963) enrolled at the University of Chicago in 1896, where John Dewey and James Rowland Angell had arrived two years earlier. Dewey was Professor of Philosophy and J. R. Angell, outspoken in his insistence on equal opportunities for men and women (Scarborough & Furumoto, 1987), was Assistant Professor of Psychology and Director of the […]

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WOMEN PIONEERS OF EMPIRICAL AESTHETICS (2): Margaret Floy Washburn

Margaret Floy Washburn (1871-1939) graduated at Vassar College. She was interested in both science and philosophy, so she decided to study psychology after graduating. She learnt that James McKeen Cattell had established a new laboratory of psychology and Columbia University, and she determined to study with him (Washburn, 1932). At that time, Columbia did not admit […]

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150 years since the first experiment in empirical aesthetics

The Madonna des Bürgermeisters Jacob Meyer zum Hasen, painted by Hans Holbein the Younger in 1526, sold for about $75 million on July 12, 2011, becoming Germany’s most expensive artwork at the time (Gropp, 2011). Not only is it regarded among the greatest German Renaissance paintings, the Madonna sparked one of the fiercest and most consequential controversies in art […]

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Women pioneers of Empirical Aesthetics (1): Lillien Jane Martin

Lillien Jane Martin (1851-1943) graduated from Vassar in 1880. She taught botany, physics, and chemistry at high schools in Indianapolis and later San Francisco. She was 43 when she resigned her position and decided to pursue psychology, a lifelong interest of hers (Fenton, 1943). She went to Göttingen in 1894, and spent four years there, even […]

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