The Arts and The Brain: Psychology and Physiology Beyond Pleasure

A whole new volume of Progress in Brain Research, edited by Julia F. Christensen & Antoni Gomila, devoted to the psychology and neuroscience of art: Progress in Brain Research Volume 237, Pages 2-484 (2018) The volume includes 22 chapters written by an amazing line-up of contributors: . The Arts, Brain and Evolution 1. Art, Symbolism and […]

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Books update

If you still don’t have Anjan Chatterjee’s The Aesthetic Brain: How We Evolved to Desire Beauty and Enjoy Art, it’s now available as a paperback! . .. . . If you’re  looking for something to go with it, Art, Aesthetics and the Brain, edited by Huston and colleagues, is now out of the oven and still warm!

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Call for proposals: Performing Psychologies

ESSAY COLLECTION CALL FOR PROPOSALS:  Performing Psychologies: Minding The Remembered Present (working title)   Edited by Pil Hansen, School of Creative and Performing Arts, University of Calgary, CA (Dramaturgy and Cognitive Performance Studies) with Bettina Blaesing, Faculty of Psychology and Sport Sciences, Bielefeld University, GE (Neurocognition and Action – Biomechanics). This book is the second […]

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Forthcoming: Art, Aesthetics and the Brain

Watch out for this new book, which will be released July this year: Huston, J. P.; Nadal, M.; Mora, F.; Agnati, L. F. & Cela-Conde, C. J. (Eds.) (2015). Art, Aesthetics and the Brain. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Description: Humans have engaged in artistic and aesthetic activities since the appearance of our species. Our ancestors have decorated their bodies, […]

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New book out: An Introduction to Neuroaesthetics

Lauring, J. O. (Ed.) (2014). An introduction to neuroaesthetics: The neuroscientific approach to aesthetic experience, artistic creativity, and arts appreciation. Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press. – From the publisher: “With this volume, Jon O. Lauring offers a cutting-edge introduction to the emerging field of neuroaesthetics. Gathering works from leading scholars all across the globe, he surveys the […]

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When misleading lines are drawn

Much of Hutton and Kelly’s unfortunate review of Shimamura’s Experiencing art rests on a biased and misguided image of the current cognitive neuroscience of aesthetics. The reviewers’ first grievance is that the book fails to “play a critical role in establishing neuroaesthetics as a subject worth taking seriously”. Such an expectation—unreasonable for a clearly introductory book—only reveals […]

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