Upcoming conference: ‘Art and the Brain’

Art and the Brain: How Imagery Makes Us Human

McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge

7th-8th December 2015

 

The Art and the Brain conference aims to encourage an interdisciplinary discussion between archaeologists, neurophysiologists and artists to develop current understandings and interpretations of non-verbal communication and the development of art in prehistory. Recent developments in the fields of neurophysiology and neuroaesthetics have highlighted the limitations, capacities and facilities of the brain with respect to our perception and cognition. These advances have thus created a platform for a new understanding of prehistoric visual imagery created by early Homo sapiens. Sessions at the conference will explore the use of colour, line and the concept of embodiment and fragmentation.

For more information regarding the conference, fees and registration, please visit the links below and for any queries, contact Sarah Evans (sce25@cam.ac.uk). The deadline for registering is 25th November.

Webpage: http://www.mcdonald.cam.ac.uk/events/artandbrain

Conference Summary

Conference Programme

Registration: http://onlinesales.admin.cam.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=299&catid=1072&prodid=1474

Communicated by Sarah Evans and Liliana Janik

Books update

chattIf you still don’t have Anjan Chatterjee’s The Aesthetic Brain: How We Evolved to Desire Beauty and Enjoy Art, it’s now available as a paperback!

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oup coverIf you’re  looking for something to go with it, Art, Aesthetics and the Brain, edited by Huston and colleagues, is now out of the oven and still warm!

The neuroaesthetics of prose fiction, by Michael Burke

Burke, M. (2015). The neuroaesthetics of prose fiction: pitfalls, parameters and prospects. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 9: 442. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2015.00442

Abstract

There is a paucity of neuroaesthetic studies on prose fiction. This is in contrast to the very many impressive studies that have been conducted in recent times on the neuroaesthetics of sister arts such as painting, music and dance. Why might this be the case, what are its causes and, of greatest importance, how can it best be resolved? In this article, the pitfalls, parameters and prospects of a neuroaesthetics of prose fiction will be explored. The article itself is part critical review, part methodological proposal and part opinion paper. Its aim is simple: to stimulate, excite and energize thinking in the discipline as to how prose fiction might be fully integrated in the canon of neuroaesthetics and to point to opportunities where neuroimaging studies on literary discourse processing might be conducted in collaborative work bringing humanists and scientists together.

Get the whole paper here!

Stimulating research on the biological basis of aesthetics

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