Tag Archives: conference

2016 international Conference on Mobile Brain-Body Imaging and the Neuroscience of Art, Innovation and Creativity

Meeting Announcement
2016 International Conference on Mobile Brain-Body Imaging (MoBI) and the Neuroscience of Art, Innovation and Creativity 
Live Aqua, Cancun, Mexico 
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The 2016 International Conference on Mobile Brain-Body Imaging (MoBI) and the Neuroscience of Art, Innovation and Creativity (http://yourbrainonart.egr.uh.edu/) is organized by the University of Houston’s Non-Invasive Brain Machine Interface Systems Laboratory and the Blaffer Art Museum in collaboration with the Houston Methodist Center for Performing Arts Medicine and Technische Universität Berlin.
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The conference will take place at the Live Aqua Resort (http://www.liveaqua.com/es/web/live-aquacancun) in Cancun on July 24-27, 2016 and is by invitation only to ensure breadth and representation of all stake-holders. It seeks to unite thought-leaders and innovators acting at the intersection of the arts, neuroscience, engineering, media, industry, education and medicine to review the state of the art, identify challenges and opportunities and create a roadmap for the field moving forward to promote creativity and innovation leading to novel approaches to solving complex challenges in engineering, science, education and medicine while informing the emergent fields of neuroaesthetics and neurocreativity.
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The goal is to provoke day-long discussion across five critical areas leading to the development of an strategic plan (RoadMap) for inclusion of the creative arts to foster creativity in science and engineering: 1) How best to achieve an advanced understanding of human responses to emotionally rich stimuli such as the creative arts, our physical environments, and our interactions with technology? 2) What is the best approach for uncovering basic neural mechanisms (‘reverse engineering’ the brain) underlying aesthetic and creative experiences? 3) What are the artistic, scientific and engineering challenges that affect collaboration and innovation? 4) How to promote or enhance creativity? 5) How to design new tools for understanding and promoting creativity, health, and wellness.
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Topics to be addressed include but are not limited to:
  • Neural and behavioral individuality and variation
  • Cognitive, affective and neural processes in realistic, complex environments;
  • Neuroaesthetics
  • Arts, creativity and insight
  • Neuroengineering and brain-inspired art
  • Wearable MoBI technologies
  • Big data in neuroscience and cognitive science
  • Art therapy;
  • Cognitive, Medical and Pedagogical Applications
  • Brain-Computer Interfaces
  • Emotional Intelligence

Findings, including contributed papers and discussions, will appear in a special issue in the open source Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. Talks will be organized in single-track but much time will be reserved for informal discussions, hands-on demonstrations, artistic performances, exhibitions, and interactions among researchers.

A doctoral/postdoctoral consortium will be an important part of the meeting to support the next generation of trans-disciplinary researchers and artists. Partial funding, based on a competitive curated selection of applicants, is available, please see conference website for further information and application procedure.
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Trans-disciplinary faculty and artists are also invited to participate. Please contact the Conference Chair at jlcontreras-vidal@uh.edu (http://www.ee.uh.edu/faculty/contreras-vidal)
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For information about the schedule, current list of confirmed speakers, and sponsors, please visit http://yourbrainonart.egr.uh.edu/

Upcoming conference: ‘Art and the Brain’

Art and the Brain: How Imagery Makes Us Human

McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge

7th-8th December 2015

 

The Art and the Brain conference aims to encourage an interdisciplinary discussion between archaeologists, neurophysiologists and artists to develop current understandings and interpretations of non-verbal communication and the development of art in prehistory. Recent developments in the fields of neurophysiology and neuroaesthetics have highlighted the limitations, capacities and facilities of the brain with respect to our perception and cognition. These advances have thus created a platform for a new understanding of prehistoric visual imagery created by early Homo sapiens. Sessions at the conference will explore the use of colour, line and the concept of embodiment and fragmentation.

For more information regarding the conference, fees and registration, please visit the links below and for any queries, contact Sarah Evans (sce25@cam.ac.uk). The deadline for registering is 25th November.

Webpage: http://www.mcdonald.cam.ac.uk/events/artandbrain

Conference Summary

Conference Programme

Registration: http://onlinesales.admin.cam.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=299&catid=1072&prodid=1474

Communicated by Sarah Evans and Liliana Janik

Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society

The Cognitive Neuroscience Society is holding its 22nd Annual Meeting in San Francisco on March 28-31, 2015. There is a full schedule of events, including Invited Symposia, Mini Symposia, Poster Sessions, as well as several award presentations. For those of us interested in neuroaesthetics, this year’s Keynote speaker is Anjan Chatterjee, who will be delivering a talk on “The neuroscience of aesthetics and art”. Save the date: Saturday, March 28, 2015, 2:00 – 3:00 pm. It’s open to the public!

Keynote abstract

What can neuroscience possibly tell us about aesthetics and art? In this talk, I will offer a framework from which a neuroscientist might decompose aesthetic experiences. I will discuss findings from neurology and cognitive neuroscience that reveal neural structures and networks engaged when we respond to beauty and react to art. I will consider the uneasy relationship between scientific aesthetics and the humanities, dispel some critiques, and acknowledge specific limitations of neuroaesthetics. Finally, informed by our understanding of the neural underpinnings of art, I will speculate about its evolution. Previous debates about whether art-making and appreciation represent an instinct or an epiphenomenon of other evolved capacities are probably not well-framed. I offer a third way to think about why we are now – and perhaps have always been – surrounded by these mysterious objects that we call art.