Call for papers for the 7th EVOMUSART conference

The 7th International Conference on Computational Intelligence in Music, Sound, Art and Design (evoMUSART) will be held in Parma in 4-6 April 2018, as part of the evo* event. The main goal of EvoMusArt is to bring together researchers who are using Computational Intelligence techniques for artistic tasks such as visual art, music, architecture, video, digital games, poetry, or design. The conference gives researchers in the field the opportunity to promote, present and discuss ongoing work in the area.

Important dates:

  • Submission: 1 November 2017
  • Notification to authors: 3 January 2018
  • Camera-ready deadline: 15 January 2018
  • Evo*: 4-6 April 2018

We welcome submissions which use Computational Intelligence techniques (e.g. Evolutionary Computation, Artificial Life, Machine Learning, Swarm Intelligence) in the generation, analysis and interpretation of art, music, design, architecture and other artistic fields. Submissions must be at most 16 pages long, in Springer LNCS format (instructions downloadable from http://www.springer.com/computer/lncs?SGWID=0-164-6-793341-0). Each submission must be anonymised for a double-blind review process and submitted to http://myreview.csregistry.org/evomusart18/ (which should be online soon). The deadline for submission is 1 November 2017, and acceptance notification on 3 January 2018. Accepted papers will be presented orally or as posters at the event and included in the evoMUSART proceedings published by Springer Verlag in a dedicated volume of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science series.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

Generation:

  • Systems that create drawings, images, animations, sculptures, poetry, text, designs, webpages, buildings, etc.;
  • Systems that create musical pieces, sounds, instruments, voices, sound effects, sound analysis, etc.;
  • Systems that create artifacts such as game content, architecture, furniture, based on aesthetic and functional criteria.
  • Robotic-Based Evolutionary Art and Music;
  • Other related artificial intelligence or generative techniques in the fields of Computer Music, Computer Art, etc.;

Theory:

  • Computational Aesthetics, Experimental Aesthetics; Emotional Response, Surprise, Novelty;
  • Representation techniques;
  • Surveys of the current state-of-the-art in the area; identification of weaknesses and strengths; comparative analysis and classification;
  • Validation methodologies;
  • Studies on the applicability of these techniques to related areas;
  • New models designed to promote the creative potential of biologically inspired computation;

Computer Aided Creativity and computational creativity:

  • Systems in which computational intelligence is used to promote the creativity of a human user;
  •  New ways of integrating the user in the evolutionary cycle;
  • Analysis and evaluation of: the artistic potential of biologically inspired art and music; the artistic processes inherent to these approaches; the resulting artefacts;
  • Collaborative distributed artificial art environments; Automation:
  • Techniques for automatic fitness assignment
  • Systems in which an analysis or interpretation of the artworks is used in conjunction with computational intelligence techniques to produce novel objects;
  • Systems that resort to computational intelligence approaches to perform the analysis of image, music, sound, sculpture, or some other types of artistic object or resource.

More information on the submission process of evoMUSART 2018 can be found at http://www.evostar.org/2018/cfp_evomusart.php Past Evomusart papers can be found http://evomusart-index.dei.uc.pt/

We look forward to seeing you in Parma in 2018!

The evoMUSART 2018 organisers

The quartet theory of human emotions – Koelsch et al. 2015

Check out this new paper on the neural foundations of human emotions (it comes with many great commentaries):

Koelsch, S., Jacobs, A. M.,  Menninghaus, W.,  Liebal, K.,  Klann-Delius, G.,  von Scheve, C.,  Gebauer, G. (2015) The quartet theory of human emotions: An integrative and neurofunctional modelPhysics of Life Reviews, 13, 1-27.

Abstract

Despite an explosion of research in the affective sciences during the last few decades, interdisciplinary theories of human emotions are lacking. Here we present a neurobiological theory of emotions that includes emotions which are uniquely human (such as complex moral emotions), considers the role of language for emotions, advances the understanding of neural correlates of attachment-related emotions, and integrates emotion theories from different disciplines. We propose that four classes of emotions originate from four neuroanatomically distinct cerebral systems. These emotional core systems constitute a quartet of affect systems: the brainstem-, diencephalon-, hippocampus-, and orbitofrontal-centred affect systems. The affect systems were increasingly differentiated during the course of evolution, and each of these systems generates a specific class of affects (e.g., ascending activation, pain/pleasure, attachment-related affects, and moral affects). The affect systems interact with each other, and activity of the affect systems has effects on – and interacts with – biological systems denoted here as emotional effector systems. These effector systems include motor systems (which produce actions, action tendencies, and motoric expression of emotion), peripheral physiological arousal, as well as attentional and memory systems. Activity of affect systems and effector systems is synthesized into an emotion percept (pre-verbal subjective feeling), which can be transformed (or reconfigured) into a symbolic code such as language. Moreover, conscious cognitive appraisal (involving rational thought, logic, and usually language) can regulate, modulate, and partly initiate, activity of affect systems and effector systems. Our emotion theory integrates psychological, neurobiological, sociological, anthropological, and psycholinguistic perspectives on emotions in an interdisciplinary manner, aiming to advance the understanding of human emotions and their neural correlates.

Forthcoming: Art, Aesthetics and the Brain

Watch out for this new book, which will be released July this year: Huston, J. P.; Nadal, M.; Mora, F.; Agnati, L. F. & Cela-Conde, C. J. (Eds.) (2015). Art, Aesthetics and the Brain. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

oup cover

Description:

Humans have engaged in artistic and aesthetic activities since the appearance of our species. Our ancestors have decorated their bodies, tools, and utensils for over 100,000 years. The expression of meaning using color, line, sound, rhythm, or movement, among other means, constitutes a fundamental aspect of our species’ biological and cultural heritage. Art and aesthetics, therefore, contribute to our species identity and distinguish it from its living and extinct relatives.

Science is faced with the challenge of explaining the natural foundations of such a unique trait, and the way cultural processes nurture it into magnificent expressions, historically and ethnically unique. How does the human brain bring about these sorts of behaviors? What neural processes underlie the appreciation of painting, music, and dance? How does training modulate these processes? How are they impaired by brain lesions and neurodegenerative diseases? How did such neural underpinnings evolve? Are humans the only species capable of aesthetic appreciation, or are other species endowed with the rudiments of this capacity?

This volume brings together the work on such questions by leading experts in genetics, psychology, neuroimaging, neuropsychology, art history, and philosophy. It sets the stage for a cognitive neuroscience of art and aesthetics, understood in the broadest possible terms. With sections on visual art, dance, music, neuropsychology, and evolution, the breadth of this volume’s scope reflects the richness and variety of topics and methods currently used today by scientists to understand the way our brain endows us with the faculty to produce and appreciate art and aesthetics.

Contents:

Section One: Foundational Issues 

  1.  Neuroculture: A new cultural revolution?, Francisco Mora
  2. Art, meaning, and aesthetics: the case for a cognitive neuroscience of art, William P. Seeley
  3. States, people, and contexts: Three psychological challenges for the neuroscience of aesthetics, Kirill Fayn and Paul J. Silvia
  4. Aesthetic appreciation – convergence from experimental aesthetics and physiology, Helmut Leder, Gernot Gerger and David Brieber
  5. The moving eye of the beholder. Eye-tracking and the perception of paintings, Christoph Klein and Raphael Rosenberg

Section Two: Cognitive Neuroscience of Visual Aesthetics and Art 

  1. Neural mechanisms for evaluating the attractiveness of faces, Spas Getov and Joel S. Winston
  2. Indeterminate art works and the human brain, Robert Pepperell and Alumit Ishai
  3. Contextual bias and insulation against bias during esthetic rating: the implication of VMPFC and DLPFC in neural valuation, Ulrich Kirk and David Freedberg
  4. Neuroimaging studies of making aesthetic products, Oshin Vartanian

Section Three: Cognitive Neuroscience of Dance 

  1. Beautiful embodiment: The shaping of aesthetic preference by personal experience, Emily S. Cross
  2. Sensorimotor aesthetics: Neural correlates of aesthetic perception of dance, Beatriz Calvo-Merino
  3. Towards ecological validity in empirical aesthetics of dance, Julia F. Christensen and Corinne Jola

Section Four: Cognitive Neuroscience of Music 

  1. Liking music: Genres, contextual factors, and individual differences, Kathleen A. Corrigall and E. Glenn Schellenberg
  2. Tension-resolution patterns as a key element of aesthetic experience: psychological principles and underlying brain mechanisms, Moritz Lehne and Stefan Koelsch
  3. From pleasure to liking and back: Bottom-up and top-down neural routes to the aesthetic enjoyment of music, Elvira Brattico
  4. Effects of expertise on the cognitive and neural processes involved in musical appreciation, Marcus T. Pearce

Section Five: Neuropsychology of Art and Aesthetics 

  1. The neuropsychology of visual art, Anjan Chatterjee
  2. The creation of art in the setting of dementia, Indre Viskontas and Suzee Lee
  3. Hemispheric specialization, art, and aesthetics, Dahlia W. Zaidel

Section Six: The Evolution of Art, Aesthetics, and the Brain 

  1. Towards a comparative approach to empirical aesthetics, Gesche Westphal-Fitch and W. Tecumseh Fitch
  2. Art and brain coevolution, Camilo J. Cela-Conde and Francisco J. Ayala
  3. Art as a human “instinct-like” behaviour emerging from the exaptation of the communication processes, Luigi F. Agnati, Diego Guidolin, and Kjell Fuxe

Section Seven: Integrative Approaches 

  1. Neurobiological foundations of art and aesthetics, Edmund T. Rolls
  2. Aesthetic evaluation of art: a formal approach, Alexander J. Huston and Joseph P. Huston
  3. Tempos of eternity: music, volition, and playing with time, Barbara G. Goodrich