MSc in Psychology of the Arts, Neuroaesthetics and Creativity

Looking for additional education opportunities in the field of creativity, art, empirical aesthetics or neuroaesthetics? Here is a great opportunity: Goldsmiths, University of London is launching a new MSc programme for the academic year 2018-19 in Psychology of the Arts, Neuroaesthetics and Creativity. It will be led by Guido Orgs, Rebecca Chamberlain, and Joydeep Bhattacharya.

The MSc in Psychology of the Arts, Neuroaesthetics and Creativity is the first postgraduate programme in the world for the scientific study of aesthetics and creativity. At the intersection of the arts and the sciences, the programme introduces you to the psychology and the cognitive neuroscience of how humans generate new ideas, how we appreciate beauty, and how we form preferences.

Students of this MSc will take core modules in psychology and neuroscience of aesthetics and creativity and scientific research methods, and optional modules in collaborating departments such as media and communications, computing and management students. A core component of the programme is a research project with an interdisciplinary focus, working with partners inside and outside the college.

The programme has a website with a broad overview: http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/msc-psychology-arts-neuroaesthetics-creativity/

Applications will open shortly before Christmas and in the meantime interested students can contact Guido Orgs (g.orgs@gold.ac.uk) or Rebecca Chamberlain (r.chamberlain@gold.ac.uk) for further information.

Upcoming conference: ‘Art and the Brain’

Art and the Brain: How Imagery Makes Us Human

McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge

7th-8th December 2015

 

The Art and the Brain conference aims to encourage an interdisciplinary discussion between archaeologists, neurophysiologists and artists to develop current understandings and interpretations of non-verbal communication and the development of art in prehistory. Recent developments in the fields of neurophysiology and neuroaesthetics have highlighted the limitations, capacities and facilities of the brain with respect to our perception and cognition. These advances have thus created a platform for a new understanding of prehistoric visual imagery created by early Homo sapiens. Sessions at the conference will explore the use of colour, line and the concept of embodiment and fragmentation.

For more information regarding the conference, fees and registration, please visit the links below and for any queries, contact Sarah Evans (sce25@cam.ac.uk). The deadline for registering is 25th November.

Webpage: http://www.mcdonald.cam.ac.uk/events/artandbrain

Conference Summary

Conference Programme

Registration: http://onlinesales.admin.cam.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=299&catid=1072&prodid=1474

Communicated by Sarah Evans and Liliana Janik

Books update

chattIf you still don’t have Anjan Chatterjee’s The Aesthetic Brain: How We Evolved to Desire Beauty and Enjoy Art, it’s now available as a paperback!

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oup coverIf you’re  looking for something to go with it, Art, Aesthetics and the Brain, edited by Huston and colleagues, is now out of the oven and still warm!